bioinformatics minor courses

 


Core Courses:

These three classes are most relevant to the Bioinformatics Minor. We encourage students interested in careers in Bioinformatics to take as many of these courses as possible. Completion of two out of three courses is required to complete the Bioinformatics Minor. However, we encourage students to take the remaining core course as an elective! They require statistics and programming prerequisites:

  1. Statistics 100A or Math 170A or Biostatistics 100A or 110A
  2. AND one of Program In Computing (PIC) 10C or Computer Science 32.

In order to take PIC 10C or Computer Science 32, students should complete PIC 10A,10B or Computer Science 31. Mathematics 33A is also strongly recommended for students interested in taking the core courses.

Computer Science 121. Introduction to Bioinformatics and Genomics. (4)
(Same as Chemistry CM160A.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, two hours. Recommended requisites: CS32 or Program in Computing 10C, and Biostatistics 100A or 110A or Mathematics 170A or Statistics 100A. Introduction to bioinformatics and methodologies, with emphasis on concepts and inventing new computational and statistical techniques to analyze biological data. Focus on sequence analysis and alignment algorithms.The course is intended for both students in engineering as well as students from the biological sciences and medical school.  No prior knowledge of biology is required.  Concurrently scheduled with course Computer Science CM221. P/NP or letter grading.

Computer Science 122. Algorithms in Bioinformatics and Systems. (4)
(Same as Chemistry CM160B) .  Lecture, four hours; discussion, two hours. Recommended requisite:  Computer Science 32 or Program in Computing 10C, and and Biostatistics 100A or 110A or Mathematics 170A or Statistics 100A. Development and application of computational approaches to biological questions. Focus on formulating interdisciplinary problems as computational problems and then solving these problems using algorithmic techniques.   The computational techniques discussed include techniques from statistics and computer science.  The course is intended for both students in engineering as well as students from the biological sciences and medical school.  Concurrently scheduled with course Computer Science CM222. Letter grading.

Computer Science 124. Computational Genetics (4)
(Same as Human Genetics CM124.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, two hours.  Recommended requisite:  Computer Science 32 or Program in Computing 10C, and and Biostatistics 100A or 110A or Mathematics 170A or Statistics 100A.  Introduction to computational analysis of genetic variation and computational interdisciplinary research in genetics. Topics include introduction to genetics, identification of genes involved in disease, inferring human population history, technologies for obtaining genetic information and genetic sequencing.  Focus on formulating interdisciplinary problems as computational problems and then solving these problems using computational techniques.   The computational techniques discussed include techniques from statistics and computer science.  The course is intended for both students in engineering as well as students from the biological sciences and medical school.  Concurrently scheduled with course Computer Science CM224. Letter grading.


 

Introductory Seminar:

The Introduction to Computational and Systems Biology seminar is a great way to get an introduction and overview of Computational Biology and Bioinformatics at UCLA. Students are encouraged to take this seminar as early as possible. This seminar course is a requirement for the Bioinformatics Minor.

Computer Science M184. Introduction to Computational and Systems Biology. (2)
(Same as Bioengineering M184 and Computational and Systems Biology M184.) Lecture, two hours; outside study, four hours. Enforced requisites: one course from 31, Civil Engineering M20, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering M20, or Program in Computing 10A, and Mathematics 3B or 31B. Survey course designed to introduce students to computational and systems modeling and computation in biology and medicine, providing motivation, flavor, culture, and cutting-edge contributions in computational biosciences and aiming for more informed basis for focused studies by students with computational and systems biology interests. Presentations by individual UCLA researchers discussing their active computational and systems biology research. P/NP grading.


 

Bioinformatics and Genomics Electives:

These courses cover various topics in Bioinformatics, Genomics and Computational Biology. All of these courses are electives in the Bioinformatics Minor. Unlike the Bioinformatics core courses, many of these courses do not require the programming or statistics prerequisites. Thus these courses are often a good starting point for students in the life sciences interested in Bioinformatics.

Chemistry C100. Genomics and Computational Biology. (5)
Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: course 153B. Introduction for biochemistry students of technologies and experimental data of genomics, as well as computational tools for analyzing them. Biochemistry and molecular biology dissected life into its component parts, one gene at time, but lacked integrative mechanisms for putting this information back together to predict what happens in complete organism (e.g., over 80 percent of drug candidates fail in clinical trials). High-throughput technologies such as sequencing, microarrays, mass-spec, and robotics have given biologists incredible new capabilities to analyze complete genomes, expression patterns, functions, and interactions across whole organisms, populations, and species. Use and analysis of such datasets becomes essential daily activity for biomedical scientists. Core principles and methodologies for analyzing genomics data to answer biological and medical questions, with focus on concepts that guide data analysis rather than algorithm details. Concurrently scheduled with course C200. P/NP or letter grading

Computer Science CM121. Introduction to Bioinformatics. (4)
(Same as Chemistry CM160A.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, two hours. Enforced requisites: course 32 or Program in Computing 10C with grade of C- or better, and one course from Biostatistics 100A, 110A, Civil Engineering 110, Electrical Engineering 131A, Mathematics 170A, or Statistics 100A. Prior knowledge of biology not required. Designed for engineering students as well as students from biological sciences and medical school. Introduction to bioinformatics and methodologies, with emphasis on concepts and inventing new computational and statistical techniques to analyze biological data. Focus on sequence analysis and alignment algorithms. Concurrently scheduled with course CM221. P/NP or letter grading.

Computer Science CM122. Algorithms in Bioinformatics and Systems Biology. (4)
(Same as Chemistry CM160B.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, two hours. Enforced requisites: course 32 or Program in Computing 10C with grade of C- or better, and one course from Biostatistics 100A, 110A, Civil Engineering 110, Electrical Engineering 131A, Mathematics 170A, or Statistics 100A. Course CM121 is not requisite to CM122. Designed for engineering students as well as students from biological sciences and medical school. Development and application of computational approaches to biological questions, with focus on formulating interdisciplinary problems as computational problems and then solving these problems using algorithmic techniques. Computational techniques include those from statistics and computer science. Concurrently scheduled with course CM222. Letter grading.

Computer Science CM124. Computational Genetics. (4)
(Same as Human Genetics CM124.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, two hours; outside study, six hours. Enforced requisites: course 32 or Program in Computing 10C with grade of C- or better, and one course from Biostatistics 100A, 110A, Civil Engineering 110, Electrical Engineering 131A, Mathematics 170A, or Statistics 100A. Designed for engineering students as well as students from biological sciences and medical school. Introduction to computational analysis of genetic variation and computational interdisciplinary research in genetics. Topics include introduction to genetics, identification of genes involved in disease, inferring human population history, technologies for obtaining genetic information, and genetic sequencing. Focus on formulating interdisciplinary problems as computational problems and then solving those problems using computational techniques from statistics and computer science. Concurrently scheduled with course CM224. Letter grading.

Computer Science/Computational and Systems Biology CM186. Computational Systems Biology: Modeling and Simulation of Biological Systems. (5)
(Same as Bioengineering CM186 and Computational and Systems Biology M186.) Lecture, four hours; laboratory, three hours; outside study, eight hours. Corequisite: Electrical Engineering 102. Dynamic biosystems modeling and computer simulation methods for studying biological/biomedical processes and systems at multiple levels of organization. Control system, multicompartmental, predator-prey, pharmacokinetic (PK), pharmacodynamic (PD), and other structural modeling methods applied to life sciences problems at molecular, cellular (biochemical pathways/networks), organ, and organismic levels. Both theory- and data-driven modeling, with focus on translating biomodeling goals and data into mathematics models and implementing them for simulation and analysis. Basics of numerical simulation algorithms, with modeling software exercises in class and PC laboratory assignments. Concurrently scheduled with course CM286. Letter grading.

Computational and Systems Biology M187. Research Communication in Computational and Systems Biology. (2 to 4)
(Same as Bioengineering C M187 and Computer Science CM187.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course M186. Closely directed, interactive, and real research experience in active quantitative systems biology research laboratory. Direction on how to focus on topics of current interest in scientific community, appropriate to student interests and capabilities. Critiques of oral presentations and written progress reports explain how to proceed with search for research results. Major emphasis on effective research reporting, both oral and written. Letter grading.

Ecology and Evolutionary Biology C135. Population Genetics. (4)
Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: Life Sciences 4. Strongly recommended: course 100, Mathematics 31A, 31B. Basic principles of genetics of population, dealing with genetic structure of natural populations and mechanisms of evolution. Equilibrium conditions and forces altering gene frequencies, polygenic inheritance, molecular evolution, and methods of quantitative genetics. Concurrently scheduled with course C235. Letter grading.

Human Genetics C144. Genomic Technology. (4)
Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: Life Sciences 4. Survey of key technologies that have led to successful application of genomics to biology, with focus on theory behind specific genome-wide technologies and their current applications. Concurrently scheduled with course C244. S/U or letter grading.

Physiological Sciences 125. Molecular Systems Biology. (5)
Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisites: Life Sciences 2, 3, 4, 23L. Quantitative description of molecular systems that underlie myriad phenotypes in living cells. Topics include various -omics fields and high-throughput technologies, network biology, and synthetic biology. Introductory lectures on molecular biology, emerging bioinformatic approaches, and systems modeling integrated with discussions of their applications in disease-related research. Review of recent literature to gain overall perspectives about new science of systems biology. Letter grading.


 

Biology, Statistics and Computational Background Courses:

These courses are taken for credit to fulfill requirements for the Bioinformatics Minor. Many of these courses can also be counted as electives in Major degree plans.

Computer Science 170A. Mathematical Modeling and Methods for Computer Science. (4)
Lecture, four hours; laboratory, two hours; outside study, six hours. Enforced requisites: course 180, Mathematics 33B. Introduction to methods for modeling and simulation using interactive computing environments. Extensive coverage of methods for numeric and symbolic computation, matrix algebra, statistics, floating point, optimization, and spectral analysis. Emphasis on applications in simulation of physical systems. Letter grading.

Electrical Engineering 102. Systems and Signals. (4)
Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisite: Mathematics 33A. Corequisite: Mathematics 33B. Elements of differential equations, first- and second-order equations, variation of parameters method and method of undetermined coefficients, existence and uniqueness. Systems: input/output description, linearity, time-invariance, and causality. Impulse response functions, superposition and convolution integrals. Laplace transforms and system functions. Fourier series and transforms. Frequency responses, responses of systems to periodic signals. Sampling theorem. Letter grading.

Electrical Engineering 141. Principles of Feedback Control. (4)
Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Enforced requisite: course 102. Mathematical modeling of physical control systems in form of differential equations and transfer functions. Design problems, system performance indices of feedback control systems via classical techniques, root-locus and frequency-domain methods. Computer-aided solution of design problems from real world. Letter grading.

Molecular Cellular and Developmental Biology 144. Molecular Biology of Cellular Processes. (5)
Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: Life Sciences 3, 4, 23L. Not open for credit to students with credit for Chemistry 153B. Development of thorough understanding of fundamentals of modern molecular biology both from perspective of known molecular mechanisms for regulating fundamental processes in cells and from theoretical applied perspective for using molecular biology as laboratory tool. Special emphasis on molecular mechanisms that relate to chromatin and histone modifications, DNA replication and repair, transposition, microRNAs, meiosis, and splicing. Application of molecular biology as tool to understand embryonic development, reprogramming, cancer, and stem cells. Development of sophisticated understanding of DNA, RNA, and protein as well as capability of designing experiments to address fundamental questions in biology and interpreting experimental data. Letter grading.

Statistics 100A. Introduction to Probability. (4)
Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: Mathematics 32B, 33A. Not open to students with credit for Electrical Engineering 131A or Mathematics 170A; open to graduate students. Students may receive credit for only two of following: course 100A, former course 110A, Biostatistics 100A. Probability distributions, random variables, vectors, and expectation. P/NP or letter grading.

Statistics 100B. Introduction to Mathematical Statistics. (4)
Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: course 100A or Mathematics 170A. Survey sampling, estimation, testing, data summary, one- and two-sample problems. P/NP or letter grading.


 

Other Statistics Courses:

These courses are not approved electives for the Bioinformatics Minor, but they fulfill prerequisites for core courses that are required for completion of the Minor.

Civil and Environmental Engineering 110. Introduction to Probability and Statistics for Engineers. (4)
(Formerly numbered 160.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: course 15, Mathematics 32A, 33A. Introduction to fundamental concepts and applications of probability and statistics in civil engineering, with focus on how these concepts are used in experimental design and sampling, data analysis, risk and reliability analysis, and project design under uncertainty. Topics include basic probability concepts, random variables and analytical probability distributions, functions of random variables, estimating parameters from observational data, regression, hypothesis testing, and Bayesian concepts. Letter grading.

Electrical Engineering 131A. Probability and Statistics. (4)
Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, 10 hours. Requisites: course 102 (enforced), Mathematics 32B, 33B. Introduction to basic concepts of probability, including random variables and vectors, distributions and densities, moments, characteristic functions, and limit theorems. Applications to communication, control, and signal processing. Introduction to computer simulation and generation of random events. Letter grading.

Mathematics 170A. Probability Theory. (4)
Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: courses 32B, 33A. Not open to students with credit for Electrical Engineering 131A or Statistics 100A. Probability distributions, random variables and vectors, expectation. P/NP or letter grading.

 

Approved Elective Courses Not Currently Offered:

These courses are approved electives for the Bioinformatics Minor, but they are infrequently taught. Consult with your academic counselor for availability.

Molecular Cellular and Developmental Biology 172. Genomics and Bioinformatics. (5)
Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: course 144 or 165B or Chemistry 153B or Microbiology 132. Genomics is study of complete repertoire of molecules in cells. Topics include human and yeast genomes and genetic approaches to study of function of individual genes, fundamental bioinformatics algorithms used to study relationship between nucleotide and protein sequences and reconstruction of their evolution, use of microarray technologies to measure changes in gene expression, analysis of microarray data including clustering and promoter analysis, proteomics topics including protein expression and interactions, epigenomic study of DNA methylation and chromatin modification, and systems biology, or computational approaches to integrating varied genomic data to gain more complete understanding of cellular biology. Letter grading.